Want to know what types of books people who work in a library Read?

Check out these recommendations by members of the James V. Brown Library staff – and see what we just can’t put down right now!

Kid Picks are over here!

July Reviews

Mairelon the Magician by Patricia C. Wrede

I read this book for the first time a long, long time ago. As I have recently uncovered its sequel, I thought I would revisit it. It is very fun. We have it shelved in the adult fiction, but it is also appropriate for younger readers. Kim, a teenage girl pretending to...

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Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

This memoir has been all over the news lately, as its author explores the difficulty and trauma of his childhood and how he eventually became a Yale educated lawyer. Vance’s mother struggled with addiction; a never-ending stream of unsuitable men were a part of his...

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Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

Hawkins, author of the sensational Girl on a Train, is back with this atmospheric thriller. A single mother drowns in a river by her house, under mysterious circumstances. Her work involved documenting the deaths of troublesome women in this same river and drowning...

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Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh

So here we are. My name was Eileen Dunlop. Now you know me. I was twenty-four years old then, and had a job that paid fifty-seven dollars a week as a kind of secretary at a private juvenile correctional facility for teenage boys….This is the story of how I...

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Theft by Finding: Diaries 1977-2002 by David Sedaris

David Sedaris on audio is a true treat. Sedaris began keeping a diary in 1977. His early entries reveal a young man adrift, hitch hiking back and forth across the country, picking fruit, painting. and cleaning houses for a living, all the while doing too many drugs...

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Today Will Be Different by Maria Semple

This was a fun, summer beach read about Eleanor Flood, who is having a really bad day, even though she thought today would be different. When she work up, she planned to work on the little things, but life had so much more in store for her. She ends up spending the...

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Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

I’m on a graphic novel kick, since it’s a genre I don’t tend to read much. This autobiographical graphic novel is on the Banned Books List every year, as it shares a young girl’s view of life under the Islamic Revolution in Iran. Although she is descended from the...

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Fun home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

If you’ve ever heard about The Bechdel Test – which asks whether a work of fiction features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man – this the author to whom it’s credited. Bechdel, a Beech Creek native, created this fascinating...

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June Reviews

The Story of the Lost Child by Elena Ferrante

This is the final Neapolitan novel. If you have read them all, you have followed Elena and Lila as they marry, divorce, bear children, and become successful: Elena as an author, Lila as the owner of a computer software business. Despite their success, they continue to...

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The Sellout by Paul Beatty

This novel was the first American winner of the prestigious Man Booker prize. The narrator lives in Dickens, an agrarian community in the center of Los Angeles, whose most famous resident is Hominy Jenkins, the last surviving member of the Little Rascals. Dickens has...

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Wreckage by Sascha Feinstein

Local poet and professor Feinstein is the son of Sam Feinstein, a noted abstract expressionist painter and, as it turns out, a hoarder. This is a memoir about the relationship between Sascha and Sam is explored through memory and through the author’s experience of...

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Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen

The audio is read by the Boss himself. Need I say more? The story of Springsteen’s modest beginnings in Freehold, N.J., his dysfunctional family, and his struggle with depression is told frankly and with humor. Springsteen also writes about the hard work of becoming a...

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The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

Lisa See introduces us to the Akha people of Yunnan province in this story of mothers and daughters. Li-yan grows up in a tea-growing family, in a village whose ways have not changed in thousands of years. When she becomes pregnant out of wedlock, Li-yan, with the...

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The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hanna Tinti

I loved this book. Tinti magically draws the reader into this beautiful, complicated and somewhat gritty coming-of-age story. The plot focuses on father, Sam, and his daughter, Loo, who are both haunted by the loss of Lily, their wife and mother, as well as Sam’s...

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Still Life by Louise Penny

This is the first book in Penny’s wildly popular Chief Inspector Armand Gamache series that takes place in Quebec. Gamache and his team are called to investigate an unusual death in the small hamlet of Three Pines. Beloved school teacher and budding artist Jane Neal...

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Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Thought provoking meditations about women who have gone missing from the lives of various male characters. Each character attempts to make sense of the ensuing confusion and isolation that follows the emotional cessation. Written in Murakami’s trademark magical...

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