Want to know what types of books people who work in a library Read?

Check out these recommendations by members of the James V. Brown Library staff – and see what we just can’t put down right now!

Kid Picks are over here!

May Reviews

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick

Arthur Pepper’s wife of 40 years, Miriam, died a year ago. In finally tackling cleaning out her clothes, he finds a gold charm bracelet he has never seen before. One of the charms is a beautiful elephant with an emerald, and a name and phone number engraved on it. He...

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Don’t You Cry by Mary Kubica

Mary Kubica writes the kind of thrillers I love to listen to in the car. In this fine offering, Esther Vaughn, an exemplary young woman, disappears without a trace from her Chicago apartment one Saturday night. Her roommate, Quinn, is devastated and in searching for...

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Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson

A chance encounter with a friend from her youth raises memories of the time in the seventies when August and her girlfriends were becoming women in Brooklyn.  The novel explores the different fate of each young woman, and the bonds of female friendship, enduring and...

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News of the World by Paulette Giles

An aging itinerant newsreader agrees to return a young girl freed from her Kiowa captives to her living relatives in Texas. The time is after the Civil War, and Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd makes his living by reading the news in public assemblies. Johanna, the young...

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The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

“Roanoke girls never last long around here. In the end, we either run or we die.” After her mother's suicide, 16-year-old Lane Roanoke comes to live on her grandparents’ vast estate in Kansas. Her cousin Allegra, about the same age, is there too, being raised by her...

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The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore

Young attorney Paul Cravath is chosen to defend George Westinghouse from patent infringement lawsuits about the first lightbulbs, filed by Thomas Edison, in this fast paced and entertaining historical novel. I knew nothing about the birth of the electric industry and...

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Long Black Veil by Jennifer Finney Boylan

I was completely drawn in by this story. What happened in the ruins of Eastern State Penitentiary on that night so long ago? Six college friends, a professor, and a little boy are locked in, and one of them doesn't come out. Boylan keeps us guessing who the victim is...

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Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

What can possibly happen at a simple, ordinary backyard barbecue that can change people’s lives and relationships forever? Clementine and Erika are each other’s closest friends. When Erika and her husband are invited to a spur of the moment barbecue at their...

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The Heirs by Susan Rieger

Rupert Falkes dies of cancer and his widow, Eleanor, and their 5 adult sons cope with the aftermath. Rupert was a foundling, raised by an Anglican priest at an orphanage in England. He comes to America, becomes a wealthy lawyer and marries exceptionally well. Eleanor...

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The Mothers by Brit Barrett

Seventeen-year-old Nadia Turner, grieving her mother’s suicide, takes up with the pastor’s son, Luke Sheppard. It’s a summer romance, but the pregnancy and cover-up that result have long reaching repercussions for Nadia, Luke, and Nadia’s best friend, Aubrey, as they...

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Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton

I first learned about Glennon from her Momastery blog at http://momastery.com/blog/ and Instagram account. She writes bravely and honestly about love, parenting and the other struggles many of us face. I read books by her fellow “PerSisters” from the Compassion...

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Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

I read this in April during National Poetry Month and was moved by Kaur’s painful collection of poetry about survival. The book can be triggering for some as it deals with violence and abuse, but those who read it will be forever changed.

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World Gone By by Dennis Lehane

This is the third installment in the Coughlin trilogy that continues the story of Joe Coughlin from Live By Night. It’s now 1943 and Coughlin has made a life for himself in Tamp after the death of his wife. He is haunted by a ghost that seems to be foreshadowing a...

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Survival Lessons by Alice Hoffman

This short book would make a perfect gift for someone going through a difficult time. Hoffman wrote it after being diagnosed with breast cancer and each short chapter is a roadmap to help heal. From “Choose Your Heroes,” to “Choose to Enjoy Yourself,” Hoffman...

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The Girls by Emma Cline

Sex, drugs and rock ‘n roll best describes The Girls by Emma Cline. Russell is a charismatic Charles Manson-type character who rules a commune in the 1960s. His anger and disbelief that a rock career is eluding him, leads him to command “the girls” to “take care of” a...

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Surviving the Angel of Death by Eva Mozes Kor

I have read several books about Josef Mengele, the Angel of Death, but never a first-person account. Eva Mozes Kor’s book, Surviving the Angel of Death: The True Story of a Mengele Twin in Auschwitz, is riviting. Her daily struggle, at just 10 years old, to survive...

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April Reviews

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

This is a very quick read. When it was returned to the library and I checked it in, I thought, “Oh, I can get through this!” And it was a bit of a relief. I am a feminist, but typically don’t enjoy long forays into nonfiction and am leery of feminist literature. It...

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To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey

This is Ivey’s second novel following her Pulitzer Prize finalist, The Snow Child, and I truly enjoyed it. Ivey, a native of Alaska, takes up snow-covered lands again in a story written mostly through letters. The characters are complex, unique and true and their...

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Rising Strong by Brene Brown

I recently read and reviewed another book by Brown, Daring Greatly, which focused on her doctoral research and social work study into vulnerability, shame and empathy. This is her most recent (2015) book, which expands upon her research in the previous book. She...

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Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

How much heartache can people tolerate before they start thinking “magically”? Iconic writer Joan Didion shares with readers an extremely difficult and personal time of grief and loss following the sudden death of her husband, John Gregory Dunne, on December 30, 2003,...

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Turbo Twenty Three by Janet Evanovich

I love the Stephanie Plum novels on audio. It’s like revisiting a favorite sitcom. The story matters less that the characters and they are all here: Lula, Grandma Mazar, Ranger, and company. An ice cream truck is hijacked, a corpse coated in chocolate, sprinkles rolls...

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The Dry by Jane Harper

An Australian farmer, Luke Handler, turns his gun on his wife, 7-year-old son, and himself in the middle of the worst drought the town of Kiewarra has ever seen. Aaron Falk, close friend of the farmer and a federal agent, returns to the town that rejected him 20 years...

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